Tracking the uplift in CSAT through effective Social Customer Service

According to a recent McKinsey study, companies that look to improve their (social) customer experience from average to ‘wow’ can see a 30-50% improvement in key measures such as likelihood to recommend a company and to make repeat purchases. That’s a pretty powerful incentive for getting a proactive social customer service team in place!

But, how can we look to measure and track any uplift in customer satisfaction, through our social customer service interactions? How can we compare the ‘sentiment’ of the customer tweet or post on the way in, with the customer satisfaction (CSAT) rating provided by the customer on the way out? Ultimately, how do we track the effectiveness of our social care team?

We’ve put together a 4 stage process to compare the initial sentiment of the customer service enquiry, with the post-interaction CSAT score. By linking the initial tweet or post with the post-interaction CSAT survey, we can then track and compare the uplift in social advocacy. Finally, we can then report on the average increase in CSAT through effective social customer service.

Stage 1: Capturing the initial sentiment of the customer service enquiry

A key part of this process is to measure the sentiment of the initial customer service enquiry. Is the customer contacting us to report a complaint? Or do they simply have a question to be answered? Primarily, we need to determine whether the sentiment is positive, negative or neutral. We automatically apply a sentiment score from 1-10, which can also be manually updated.

This initial tweet has a sentiment score of 2 out of 10

This initial tweet has a sentiment score of 2 out of 10.

Stage 2: Agent interacts with the customer and then invites them to take a survey

Our agents then engage with the customer and look to resolve the enquiry. At the end of the interaction, the agent uses a ‘canned response’ to send out a request for the customer to complete a CSAT survey. If the survey is completed, we track the customer ID, the agent ID and ‘link’ the survey back to the original customer service tweet or post. Our audit trail shows when a survey has been completed.

Customer service interaction, with request to complete a CSAT survey

Customer service interaction, with request to complete a CSAT survey.

Stage 3: We then track all completed CSAT surveys and link to the initial tweet

As customers complete their post-interaction CSAT surveys, we link the survey to the original tweet or post and track the results in a real-time widget. This widget shows the original tweet (with 1-10 sentiment score) and compares with the customer-driven CSAT score (also from 1-10) and comment. This allows us to define the uplift in social advocacy through our social customer care.

Initial sentiment = 2/10. CSAT score = 10/10. Uplift in social advocacy +8.

Initial sentiment = 2/10. CSAT score = 10/10. Uplift in social advocacy +8.

Stage 4: Measuring the uplift in social advocacy over time…

Finally, we need to be able to report on all of our customer service interactions that have led to a completed CSAT survey and look to measure the average improvement in social advocacy. We can report and compare across channel, by individual agent and even by mentions that include specific keywords. Ultimately, we get a tangible view of the average improvement in social advocacy.

Average sentiment = 3. Average CSAT score = 9.5. Average improvement +6.5

Average sentiment = 3. Average CSAT score = 9.5. Average improvement +6.5

If you’re looking to get a tangible measure for how your social customer service team improves customer advocacy, contact us here to arrange a quick webex of the DigiDesk and CSAT platforms.